Home Evacuation
In light of an emergency within or outside the home an evacuation may be necessary. A house may appear structurally sound and the foundations considered stable. But you can never tell, so here are a few pointers in case of a home evacuation.

Preparation

In some emergencies the safest action is to stay inside but in other emergencies it can be safer to leave a building or evacuate an entire area. The appropriate action depends on the particular hazard causing the emergency. Always follow advice from emergency authorities.

When evacuating a building it's important to agree in advance on a gathering place at a safe distance. Practise evacuation procedures, including a head count. Large buildings like apartment blocks should have evacuation plans in place.

If you decide or are advised to evacuate the area, leave as early as possible, even hours before in the case of bushfires.  
Allow for special needs of infants, the aged and people with disabilities and don't forget your pet's needs. Have your car under cover, with a full fuel tank and plan for alternative safe routes.

Three golden rules if you leave:
  • Turn off power, gas, water and lock doors and windows;
  • Take your family emergency kit with you; and
  • Listen for emergency warnings and safety advice on radio or television.

Home Evacuation








What to do

Preparedness is a vital part of planning for all emergencies - natural or otherwise. Police and emergency services have well developed, tested plans to respond to a variety of incidents. In the event of an emergency these plans will be put into action but no government can plan to have emergency workers on site immediately.  That's why community preparedness is vital - you may have to help yourself and others in the minutes directly before, during and after an emergency or disaster.

All of us will have a role to play - spend some time now to ensure you know what to do. In all types of emergencies some basic rules apply.


...............................................................................................................................

Using commonsense
  • Are you safe?
  • Are others in danger?
  • Should you take cover in a safe building?
  • Should you leave the area?
  • Make sure help is on its way - call 000.

Give clear directions to the 000 operator - provide a location, details of any injuries or threats to life.

Home Evacuation








Seek information

If you can, turn on your radio or television. Police and emergency services agencies - including fire, ambulance, health and the SES - will provide as much information as possible to media outlets telling people at or near the scene of the event what to do.

During a major emergency the media will also broadcast telephone numbers for people seeking information. Do not call 000 for general information or advice.

Follow the directions of police and emergency workers - look to people in police or emergency services uniforms to provide advice and direction and follow it. Building managers and fire wardens will also be able to provide you with advice in the case of emergency evacuations.

Know your escape routes at home. You may be told to shelter-in-place - if you are told to do this by an emergency service worker or fire warden, go into the nearest building, stay away from windows and monitor local radio for more information.

Remember, no matter what the emergency, a calm response and a commonsense approach could save your life or the lives of others. In some emergencies (such as a bushfire) you may require a special kit of basic needs, such as a radio, torch, water, medications and family documents.
 
...............................................................................................................................


Family emergency kit

In a major emergency power, telephone and other essential services may suffer failure. A small emergency kit put in handy place known to all family members will be invaluable in such an event.

A basic home emergency kit should include:
  • Battery operated radio (with spare batteries);
  • Torch (with spare batteries);
  • First aid kit and manual;
  • Telephone which doesn't require mains power to operate;
  • List of contact details for family members and emergency services;
  • Supply of medications and hygiene products;
  • Copies of important family documents (birth certificates, passports and licences)

...............................................................................................................................